Posted on September 22, 2019

1920’s perfume bottles

The 1920’s brought a new era to perfumes. After World War I, many American Soldiers brought perfumes back to the states from Paris, and greatly increased the perfume market. The perfume industry expanded rapidly, and many new perfume companies emerged. Many fashion designers entered the perfume industry. Most of these designers knew very little about creating a good perfume, but they did know about style. The visual presentation of the perfume became vital to a successful perfume.

Mascarades were very popular, and had a strong influence on perfumes. “Masque Rouge” was introduced in a very modern bottle, and the box had a red mask motif. “Mascarades” by Cherigan came in a black bottle with a golden face under a rain of gold dust. “Arlequinade” was a Rosine perfume which resembled a Harlequin costume. It had gilded and clear triangles on the bottle, and a dark-green Bakelite stopper in the form of Harlequin’s hat and an orange wood tassel.

“Bakanir” was introduced in 1927 by Honore Payan. The bottle was a simple geometric shape with a stopper resembling an exotic headdress. The box was covered with painted leather with a ceramic plaque. It was one of the most luxurious presentations for perfume.

Baccarat bottles were designed using superior quality crystal. They designed perfume bottles for most perfume companies of the time. Two of their famous perfume bottles were designed in 1927. “Silver Butterfly” by Delettrez was made of pink crystal with silver ornamentation. It was a vertical hexagon with an abstract motif. “Astris” by L.T. Piver was shaped as a star, and featured a silver six-pointed motif.

Chanel No 5 was released by Chanel in 1921. The perfume was revolutionary in scent and presentation. The bottle was very simple in design. It was intended to make the masculine world available to women.

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